What God is Saying:

"Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age." Matthew 28:19-20

Friday, March 27, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children (Day 34): Would They Have Died for a Lie?

The next day, the one after Preparation Day, the chief priests and the Pharisees went to Pilate. “Sir,” they said, “we remember that while he was still alive that deceiver said, ‘After three days I will rise again.’ So give the order for the tomb to be made secure until the third day. Otherwise, his disciples may come and steal the body and tell the people that he has been raised from the dead. This last deception will be worse than the first.”
“Take a guard,” Pilate answered. “Go, make the tomb as secure as you know how.” So they went and made the tomb secure by putting a seal on the stone and posting the guard.  
Matthew 27:62-66

Questions:
- Who was worried about Jesus' body being stolen? Why?
- What did they ask Pilate to do and how did he respond?
- How would a report that Jesus was raised from the dead be worse for the Jewish leaders than the things Jesus said and did before His crucifixion?
- Where were the disciples at this point? (They had all run away terrified and were hiding in an upper room somewhere in Jerusalem)
- Do you think they had the courage to steal Jesus' body and then claim He had risen from the dead?
- If they had stolen His body, somehow making it past a Roman guard and a sealed tomb, would they have been willing to die for a lie that they had spread? (Every single disciple, except John, died a horrible death because they continued to preach Jesus' resurrection)

Thoughts:
Even these fearful actions taken by Jesus' enemies were part of God's wonderful plan. The sealed tomb and the Roman guard are evidence that when the tomb was found empty, it was not because the disciples stole the body. We learn in the next chapter that the guards saw the angel who rolled away the stone. The guards fainted, then later reported to the chief priests and accepted a bribe from them to keep quiet about it. Obviously that didn't happen since we know about this today.

Prayer:
Dear Lord, how wonderful You are. Even the evil of men works out for Your good purposes. As we look at a sinful world around us, help us to remember that You are always in charge.

For Further Study: 
There are many children throughout the world who are very bold in their faith in Christ, especially in nations where it is hard to be a Christian. Sharing their stories can encourage a bolder faith in your children. A wonderful resource is Kids of Courage


* Some of the content of this blog is based on the book Family Celebrations at Easter by Ann Hibbard.*

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children (Day 33): Boldness in Action

Following Jesus' crucifixion:
Now there was a man named Joseph, a member of the Council, a good and upright man, who had not consented to their decision and action. He came from the Judean town of Arimathea, and he himself was waiting for the kingdom of God. Going to Pilate, he asked for Jesus’ body. Then he took it down, wrapped it in linen cloth and placed it in a tomb cut in the rock, one in which no one had yet been laid.  It was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin.
The women who had come with Jesus from Galilee followed Joseph and saw the tomb and how his body was laid in it. Then they went home and prepared spices and perfumes. But they rested on the Sabbath in obedience to the commandment. Luke 23:50-56

He was assigned a grave with the wicked,
    and with the rich in his death,
though he had done no violence,
    nor was any deceit in his mouth.  Isaiah 53:9

Questions:
- (This Joseph was not the same as Jesus' adoptive father. His adoptive father died at some point before Jesus' public ministry.) What do we learn about this Joseph?
- What did Joseph ask of Pilate?
- How do you think the Jewish council would view Joseph's request and action?
- What did he do to Jesus' body? (If he had not done this, Jesus' body would have been thrown into a pit with the other common criminals and it would not have been possible for the disciples and others to witness the empty tomb)
- What did the women do? Why?
- What prophecy did Jesus' burial fulfill (read Isaiah 53:9)?

Thoughts:
We find in Joseph a man of moral courage. Mark 14:53 says: Joseph of Arimathea, a prominent member of the Council, who was himself waiting for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate and asked for Jesus’ body, and Matthew 27:57 tells us: there came a rich man from Arimathea, named Joseph, who had himself become a disciple of Jesus.  He believed in Jesus despite what those around him were saying. He was most likely not present at the secret trial the night before. When he found out about Jesus' murder, he must have been stricken with grief. Doing the only thing he could think of, he bravely approached Pilate for Jesus' body in order to show his love for and belief in Jesus.  Pilate, after a centurion confirmed the death, allowed Joseph's request. Joseph immediately purchased fine linen (Mark 15:46) and proceeded to Golgotha to take the body of Jesus down from the cross. There, according to John 19:39, Joseph and Nicodemus took the body, wrapped it in the fine linen, and applied the myrrh and aloes Nicodemus had brought. The disciples then placed Jesus' body in Joseph's own tomb, a man-made cave hewn from rock in the garden of his house nearby.

Prayer:
Lord Jesus, Your love gives us courage. Courage to go against what others may say, courage to follow You and show our love for You, courage to walk through whatever trials You have allowed in our lives. Help us to be bold for You. We love You Jesus.

For Further Study: 
There are many children throughout the world who are very bold in their faith in Christ, especially in nations where it is hard to be a Christian. Sharing their stories can encourage a bolder faith in your children. A wonderful resource is Kids of Courage


* Some of the content of this blog is based on the book Family Celebrations at Easter by Ann Hibbard.*


Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children (Day 32): The Meaning of the Passover Meal

Then came the day of Unleavened Bread on which the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. Jesus sent Peter and John, saying, “Go and make preparations for us to eat the Passover.”
“Where do you want us to prepare for it?” they asked.
He replied, “As you enter the city, a man carrying a jar of water will meet you. Follow him to the house that he enters, and say to the owner of the house, ‘The Teacher asks: Where is the guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?’ He will show you a large room upstairs, all furnished. Make preparations there.”
They left and found things just as Jesus had told them. So they prepared the Passover.
Luke 22:7-13

The celebration for which Jesus and His disciples were preparing was the Passover meal. This reminded the Jewish people of how God had saved them from slavery in Egypt and how the Angel of Death had "passed over" their homes the night before they were freed from slavery.
All over the world Jewish people still celebrate the Passover. In the meal, each part of it has special meaning.
Karpar - parsley or another green vegetable symbolizes the coming of spring. Sometimes it is dipped in salt water, which represents the tears of the Jewish people when they were slaves.
Maror - Bitter herbs, usually horseradish, represent the bitterness of slavery.
Roasted Lamb - the Z'roa is the one part of the Seder plate that is not eaten during the dinner. Instead, it serves as a visual reminder of the special Passover sacrificial lamb offered at the temple in Jerusalem before its destruction.
Matzah - unleavened bread is eaten to remember how the Israelites had to flea Egypt before their bread had a chance to rise
Egg - Beitzah, often eaten with salt water, hard-boiled eggs are a symbol of life. It is also said to represent the second offerings presented at the temple in Jerusalem, sorrow at its destruction, and the hope that it will be rebuilt.
Charoseth - A sweet mixture of roughly chopped apples, walnuts, cinnamon and red wine, charoset represents the mortar that was used to construct the store houses by the Jewish people when they were slaves in ancient Egypt.
Elijah's Cup - One of five cups, this one symbolizing the belief that Elijah's arrival will announce the coming of the Jewish Messiah.

Questions:
- Think about the Passover Meal - what preparations needed to be made?
- How did the disciples know where to prepare for the meal?
- What do we learn about Jesus from these verses?
- Has Elijah already come? (The Bible explains that John the Baptist came in the "spirit of Elijah - he was like Elijah; "He will bring back many of the people of Israel to the Lord their God. And he will go on before the Lord, in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the parents to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous—to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.” Luke 1:16-17)

Thoughts:
Every Christian home can be enriched by celebrating Passover, just as our Lord did. For Jesus, Passover was the most significant of holy days. Because of Jesus' death and resurrection, we too can join in this special holy day. In fact, for Christians, Passover is even more significant because it finds its fulfillment in Jesus Christ. It was no accident that Jesus was crucified at Passover. He became the once for all sacrifice which allows God's judgement to "pass over" us.
Here is a wonderful website that helps you celebrate the Passover from a Christian perspective:
 A Christian Seder Meal    http://www.aholyexperience.com/2011/04/why-a-christian-family-may-celebrate-passover-a-messianic-seder/

Prayer:
Lord Jesus, we worship You and love You so very much. Enter into our thoughts and actions throughout this Easter season. Help us see You in the Passover meal. Thank You for being our sacrifice. We love You.


For Further Study: 
There are many children throughout the world who are very bold in their faith in Christ, especially in nations where it is hard to be a Christian. Sharing their stories can encourage a bolder faith in your children. A wonderful resource is Kids of Courage

* Some of the content of this blog is based on the book Family Celebrations at Easter by Ann Hibbard.*

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children (Day 31): On Jesus' Side

Keeping a close watch on him, they sent spies, who pretended to be sincere. They hoped to catch Jesus in something he said, so that they might hand him over to the power and authority of the governor. So the spies questioned him: “Teacher, we know that you speak and teach what is right, and that you do not show partiality but teach the way of God in accordance with the truth. Is it right for us to pay taxes to Caesar or not?”
He saw through their duplicity and said to them, “Show me a denarius. Whose image and inscription are on it?”
“Caesar’s,” they replied.
He said to them, “Then give back to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s.”
They were unable to trap him in what he had said there in public. And astonished by his answer, they became silent.  Luke 20:20-26

Questions: 
- Why were the Jewish leaders trying to trick Jesus?
- What question did the spies ask Jesus?
- How was this question meant to trap Jesus?
- Explain Jesus' answer.

Thoughts:
This question was meant to force Jesus to take sides between the Jews and the Romans. But Jesus pointed out that they had responsibility both to Caesar and to God. He refused to take sides. Instead He taught that each person must be responsible to obey both God and earthly leaders.
People today try to trap Jesus. We want Jesus to be on our side, to support our agenda. But the question is not, whose side is Jesus on? The true question is: Are we on His side? Will we do whatever He tells us to do?

Prayer:
Lord Jesus, may we not try to pull You to our side but instead, do all we can to be on Your side. Break our hearts for what breaks Yours. Show us where You are moving, where You are acting, and then help us to come alongside You. We want to be on Your side because we love You. Thank You Lord Jesus.

Song: Jesus, Friend of Sinners

Jesus, friend of sinners, we have strayed so far away
We cut down people in your name but the sword was never ours to swing
Jesus, friend of sinners, the truth's become so hard to see
The world is on their way to You but they're tripping over me
Always looking around but never looking up I'm so double minded
A plank eyed saint with dirty hands and a heart divided

Oh Jesus, friend of sinners
Open our eyes to the world at the end of our pointing fingers
Let our hearts be led by mercy
Help us reach with open hearts and open doors
Oh Jesus, friend of sinners, break our hearts for what breaks yours

Jesus, friend of sinners, the one who's writing in the sand
Made the righteous turn away and the stones fall from their hands
Help us to remember we are all the least of these
Let the memory of Your mercy bring Your people to their knees
Nobody knows what we're for only what we're against when we judge the wounded
What if we put down our signs crossed over the lines and loved like You did

Oh Jesus, friend of sinners
Open our eyes to world at the end of our pointing fingers
Let our hearts be led by mercy
Help us reach with open hearts and open doors
Oh Jesus, friend of sinners, break our hearts for what breaks yours

You love every lost cause; you reach for the outcast
For the leper and the lame; they're the reason that You came
Lord I was that lost cause and I was the outcast
But you died for sinners just like me, a grateful leper at Your feet

'Cause You are good, You are good and Your love endures forever
You are good, You are good and Your love endures forever
You are good, You are good and Your love endures forever
You are good, You are good and Your love endures forever

Oh Jesus, friend of sinners
Open our eyes to world at the end of our pointing fingers
Let our hearts be led by mercy
Help us reach with open hearts and open doors
Oh Jesus, friend of sinners, break our hearts for what breaks Yours

And I was the lost cause and I was the outcast
Yeah...
You died for sinners just like me, a grateful leper at Your feet



Here is a link to the song by Casting Crowns Jesus, Friend of Sinners

For Further Study: 
There are many children throughout the world who are very bold in their faith in Christ, especially in nations where it is hard to be a Christian. Sharing their stories can encourage a bolder faith in your children. A wonderful resource is Kids of Courage

* Some of the content of this blog is based on the book Family Celebrations at Easter by Ann Hibbard.*

Monday, March 23, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children (Day 30): The Narrow Door

Then Jesus went through the towns and villages, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem. Someone asked him, “Lord, are only a few people going to be saved?”
He said to them, “Make every effort to enter through the narrow door, because many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able to. Once the owner of the house gets up and closes the door, you will stand outside knocking and pleading, ‘Sir, open the door for us.’
“But he will answer, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from.’
“Then you will say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’
“But he will reply, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from. Away from me, all you evildoers!’
“There will be weeping there, and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, but you yourselves thrown out. People will come from east and west and north and south, and will take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God. Indeed there are those who are last who will be first, and first who will be last.”  Luke 13:22-30

Questions:

- What question did someone ask Jesus?
- Jesus answered by telling a story. Tell the story in your own words
- What did Jesus mean when He said, "There are those who will be first, and first who will be last?"
- How did Jesus' words make the people feel? Why?

Thoughts:
Jesus' answer was not what these people wanted to hear. Jesus said, in effect, "Not everyone will be in the kingdom of God...you may be surprised who is there and who isn't there." Walking with Jesus is not a religion, it's a relationship. Some people may look very good on the outside, they know a lot of the Bible, say the right words, sing the right songs, but their hearts are far from Jesus. They have never entered into a relationship with Him.
Jesus Himself is the "narrow door." He is "the way, the truth and the life." No one enters Heaven unless they enter through Jesus, through a relationship with Him.

Prayer:
Lord Jesus, we thank You that You are the way to enter God's Kingdom. We want to be there with You now and for eternity. Help us to have a deep, loving relationship with You and help us to show others the narrow door so they can enter as well. We love you Jesus.

Song: Just As I Am

Just as I am, without one plea
But that Thy blood was shed for me,
But that Thou bids'st me come to Thee,
Oh Lamb of God, I come, I come


For Further Study: 
There are many children throughout the world who are very bold in their faith in Christ, especially in nations where it is hard to be a Christian. Sharing their stories can encourage a bolder faith in your children. A wonderful resource is Kids of Courage

* Some of the content of this blog is based on the book Family Celebrations at Easter by Ann Hibbard.*


Sunday, March 22, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children (Day 29): Easter Symbols and Their Meanings (Part 3)




In today's devotion we will take one last look at the symbols of Easter and their meanings.

Date of Easter:
Unlike Christmas, Easter is not celebrated on the same day every year. Like Christmas, which many agree is not celebrated on the actual birth of Jesus, Easter is not celebrated on the exact date of Jesus’ death or resurrection. It is, however, celebrated at the same time of year that Jesus Christ died, the time of the Jewish Passover. The Bible states that Christ celebrated Passover with his disciples. After they ate the Passover feast they went to the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus was arrested. He was tried, condemned, and executed that same day. Three days later He rose from the dead.
Early Christians commemorated this event. The earliest recorded date of the celebration of Easter appears in the second century, but we can assume they were celebrating Easter in the church earlier than that. But even then Easter was celebrated on two different days. Jewish Christians kept Passover with a new meaning because Christ died and rose again during the Passover period. Gentile Christians, however, celebrated Easter on the Sunday after Passover because Christ rose from the dead on the first day of the week.
As time went on the confusion surrounding the date to celebrate Easter grew. In A.D. 325 a group of church leaders met in Nicea. The group, called the Council of Nicea, discussed many things including the creation of the Nicene Creed and the date to celebrate Easter. That’s why Easter is now celebrated on the Sunday following the first full moon on or after the Vernal Equinox. Because of this Easter falls between the dates of March 22 and April 25.

Palm Sunday:

On Palm Sunday, one week before Easter, Christians celebrate what is known as Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey surrounded by his disciples and crowds of people who covered the road with articles of clothing and palm branches and waved palm branches while singing and praising God.
Christians traditionally go to church on Palm Sunday where palm branches are given out during the service, remembering the palm branches that were waved when Jesus entered Jerusalem.
In some parts of the world Palm Sunday is known by other names. In parts of Wales Palm Sunday is called Flowering Sunday. On this day flowers are strewn on graves and churchyards. Also in parts of England, Palm Sunday is called Spanish Sunday. This name probably comes from a sweet drink made by children consisting of Spanish licorice shaken up in a bottle of water. Another name for Palm Sunday is Fig Sunday. Those who celebrate Fig Sunday eat figs or fig pudding in remembrance of Christ’s cursing of the fig tree, an event that occurred during Passion Week.




Maundy Thursday:
Maundy Thursday is the Thursday of Holy Week. It represents the day that the Jewish Passover was celebrated.
On that day, Jesus had his last meal with his friends and followers before he was killed. This meal is now know as 'The Last Supper'. At the meal, Jesus and his friends would have followed the Jewish Passover custom of eating roast lamb and bread and drinking red wine. However, Jesus gave the bread and wine a special meaning. When they got to the part of the meal when the bread was eaten and the wine drunk, Jesus said that these would be a symbol of his body and blood to his followers to help them remember that through his death, our sins are forgiven.
Maundy comes from Latin and is the word for 'Command', this is because Jesus commanded his followers to think of him when they ate bread and drank wine. This is very important to Christians and is now remembered in the Christian service known as Communion, Mass or Eucharist. It is practiced on Maundy Thursday.


Good Friday
Good Friday is the day thought by many to be the day that Jesus Christ died on the cross for the sins of the world.
This death of this innocent man, the Son of God, is considered so horrendous that many superstitions have arisen over the years concerning things done on Good Friday. On Good Friday miners would refuse to work fearing that a disaster would occur during the following year. Blacksmiths would not work with nails because of the nails that pierced Christ’s hands and feet. Fishermen considered it an ill-omen to put out to sea on Good Friday. Clothes would not be washed on Good Friday lest they be stained with blood and lest misfortune come upon the wearers. Not all Good Friday superstitions were bad, however. Gardeners would plant their crops on Good Friday to ensure a good harvest. They believed that the soil is redeemed from Satan’s power on Good Friday only so anything planted on that day is blessed.
At one time, in Portugal and in parts of England and Europe as well, people created a straw or wooden effigy of Judas Iscariot, the man who betrayed Jesus, and paraded it through town kicking it, cursing it, and deriding it. They would finally burn the effigy to show their contempt for the man who sent the Son of God to his death.
In Spain people participate in Semana Santa processions. These nightly processions begin on Palm Sunday and end on Good Friday. Representations of Christ, Mary, and the saints are paraded through the streets accompanied by barefooted penitents called Nazarenos wearing pointed black or white hoods with eye holes cut out of them. The procession ends with saetas, mournful songs, lamenting the death of Christ and the grief of His mother.


Attending Church

Because Easter is a celebration of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, Christians all over the world attend church on Easter Sunday. For Catholics, many attend an after-midnight Mass on Easter Sunday. Other Christians will attend an Easter Sunrise service as the Bible states "Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance," John 20:1 Still others attend church later in the morning.

New Clothes:
Wearing new clothes for Easter is a custom common among many Christians. It may have originated from the old practice of having newly baptized Christians wear new white clothes for the Easter celebration. Like many other Easter symbols, the new clothes represent the new life offered through the death and Resurrection of Jesus.
Easter promenades of people in new clothes are a tradition in many European towns and villages. A person holding a cross or an Easter candle leads some of these promenades. In New York City, thousands of people stroll in the Easter Parade down Fifth Avenue to show off their new clothes following Easter services.

Feasting:
Easter Sunday is a feast day. Many Christians in Eastern Europe and those of eastern European ancestry in North America have their Easter feast blessed by a priest. The priest may go to the home, or families may take their food to church for the blessing.



Eggs and Rabbits:
Eggs and rabbits are the only familiar symbols unrelated to the Easter story.
Bunnies and chicks are often associated with Easter because most babies of the animals are born in Spring around Easter time.

In Pagan times, like Eggs, Rabbits and Hares were signs of Good Luck and New Life. The Early Christians took over the meaning of New Life because it helped them remember Jesus being raised from the dead and having New Life.


Easter Bunny:
No one knows for sure what the origin of the Easter Bunny is. Some think the Easter bunny has its roots in European folklore as the sacred beast of the spring-goddess Eostre. This view, however, is not supported by the earliest known references. The Easter bunny, originally known as the Easter hare, was first mentioned in a German book written in the late 16th century. Another German book written in the 17th century further described the Easter hare as the shy, egg-laying creature we know today

The tradition of the Easter hare was brought to the United States by European immigrants where it was eventually changed to the Easter rabbit or Easter bunny. The legend of the Easter bunny has grown, and it continues to grow thanks to the Easter television specials produced by Rankin/Bass. In 1971 Here Comes Peter Cottontail, narrated by Danny Kaye, was produced based on the novel by Priscilla and Otto Friedrich entitled The Easter Bunny That Overslept. This was followed in 1977 by The Easter Bunny Is Coming To Town. In this holiday special, Fred Astaire, reprising his role of Special Delivery (S. D. for short) Kluger, tells the story of the origins of the Easter Bunny.

Much of the above information came from Customs of Easter

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Easter Devotion for Children: Peace Be With You



On the evening of that first day of the week, when the disciples were together, with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you!” After he said this, he showed them his hands and side. The disciples were overjoyed when they saw the Lord.
Again Jesus said, “Peace be with you! As the Father has sent me, I am sending you.” And with that he breathed on them and said, “Receive the Holy Spirit.
John 20:19-22

Did you know that the forty days of Lent do not include the Sundays? Can you guess why that is? Lent is a time of thinking about Jesus' death. Every Sunday of the year, however, is a celebration of Jesus' resurrection. For that reason, we will spend today looking at one of the resurrection stories.


Questions:
- Who did Jesus appear to on the day He was raised from the dead? (He appeared five different times: to Mary Magdalene, to the women, to two on the road to Emmaus, to Peter and here to ten of the disciples)
- How did Jesus enter the room? (We don't really know but it seems that resurrection bodies are not limited by closed doors)
- How had they behaved when Jesus was arrested? (They all ran away)
- What do you think the disciples thought would be Jesus' first words to them? (Maybe words of scolding or disappointment for their behavior)
- Instead, what were Jesus' first words to them?
- Why did Jesus show them His hands and His side? (To assure them that He was really the same person and that He was indeed alive and not a ghost or their imagination)
- What does Jesus mean when He says. "I am sending you." (Jesus gives His disciples a mission, to continue His work on this earth.)
- What do they receive from Jesus?

Thoughts
The disciples, fearful of the Jews, were astonished when Jesus miraculously appeared amongst them. Expecting words of scolding or disappointment, imagine their surprise when the first words Jesus spoke to them after their desertion were: "Peace be with you!" These words were words of reconciliation...healing between God the Son and His closest followers. They are reminiscent of the words the angel spoke to the shepherds at His birth: "Glory to God in the highest and on earth, peace and goodwill to all men." Then Jesus breathes on them the Holy Spirit. Many people see the connection between this breathing on the disciples and when God created man and breathed the breath of life in him. This is a work of re-creation, even as God breathed life into the first man. This is where the disciples are born again.

Prayer
Father God, we thank You that You are a God of reconciliation and peace. You do not treat us as our sins deserve. We thank you Jesus that You came to this earth and made a way for us to be reconciled to God. Thank you for the peace You bring. No matter what is happening around us, when we fix our eyes on You, You are our peace. We love You Jesus!

Song: He is Our Peace

He is our peace
Who has broken down every wall
He is our peace
He is our peace

He is our peace
Who has broken down every wall
He is our peace
He is our peace

Cast all your cares on Him
For He cares for you
He is our peace
He is our peace

Cast all your cares on Him
For He cares for you
He is our peace
He is our peace

For Further Study: 
There are many children throughout the world who are very bold in their faith in Christ, especially in nations where it is hard to be a Christian. Sharing their stories can encourage a bolder faith in your children. A wonderful resource is Kids of Courage

* Some of the content of this blog is based on the book Family Celebrations at Easter by Ann Hibbard.*